White and White Attorneys at Law
White & White Attorney

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How do you ensure custody decisions are in the best interests of your children?

Whenever the court makes decisions in a child custody case, it always defaults to whatever is best for the child. If you want to negotiate your custody arrangements with the other parent, you also should keep your child’s best interests in mind.

You may wonder how to do this. According to the Nemours Foundation, putting your children first in all talks about custody and focusing on their needs will help you reach the goal.

Tips for talks

It is a good idea to minimize the impact of a custody dispute on your children. Do not make big changes in their lives if it is avoidable.

In addition, you should make sure that whenever you and the other parent discuss custody issues that you do so away from the children. Never fight in front of them or use them as weapons against the other parent.

First and foremost

Your children’s well-being should come ahead of everything else when determining custody issues. You should never focus on what you want. Think of what the children want or what will be best for their health and safety.

Involvement

Both parents should also strive to be present in the children’s lives. You should avoid pushing the other parent away unless he or she presents a serious and real danger to the children’s health and safety. Children do much better when they have meaningful relationships with both parents.

Assistance

If your custody talks are especially heated, you may want to seek help. You could use a mediator or a mental health professional to assist you. If you notice your children feel the impact of the situation, you should also consider getting them help or at least providing them with someone to talk to outside of you and the other parent.